• Modified Cellulose

    SFM’s modified cellulose dressings have been specifically designed and engineered to target multiple areas shown to aid wound healing. SFM’s technology sees the addition of strengthening fibres into the non-woven material which supports the need for atraumatic dressing removal by medical professionals.

Modified Cellulose

SFM’s modified cellulose dressings have been specifically designed and engineered to target multiple areas shown to aid wound healing. SFM’s technology sees the addition of strengthening fibres into the non-woven material which supports the need for atraumatic dressing removal by medical professionals.

Modified cellulose fibres such as carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) or cellulose ethylsulfonate (CES) are capable of absorbing large amounts of fluid which is important in the management of chronic wounds.

When in the form of a non-woven dressing this conformable material can absorb a large amount of wound fluid, such as exudate with bacteria. This action transforms the dressing into a soft gel, which creates a moist environment to support the body’s healing process. The gel also aids the removal of non-viable tissue and cellular debris from the wound (a process known as autolytic debridement), without adherence to the wound bed or damaging newly formed tissue².

SFM have the ability to chemically modify cellulose fibres in many ways to enhance their functionality which means that we can change the chemical bonds in the cellulose and make it able to do something different. Furthermore, SFM use a patented dressing reinforcement approach whereby non-gelling fibres and modified fibres are intimately blended to provide enhanced fabric integrity in addition to wet strength integrity which enables intact dressing removal.

The addition to cellulose of polar ionic groups such as those in carboxymethyl cellulose or cellulose ethylsulfonate allows fluid or exudate to be bound in the fibres preventing it from being released back to the wound or spreading to and damaging the healthy tissue surrounding wound. By using specially designed equipment SFM can modify cellulose to improve the functionality of the fibres including inherent antimicrobial activity, absorbency, gelling and a host of other features.

References

1. Thomas S. The importance of secondary dressings in wound care. Available from: http://www.worldwidewounds.com/2003/january/Thomas/Atraumatic-Dressings.html

2. Formation of the scab and the rate of epithelisation of superficial wounds in the skin of the young domestic pig (Nature 193:293 1962)

Reinforced Alginate